Macy’s can take on Amazon

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How does a traditional department store retailer like Macy’s take on and compete with the tech titan Amazon? It’s not by trying to catch-up to Amazon’s technology, distribution, and logistics. That would be futile. It is, of course, by creating a compelling experience so consumers want to spend time in stores. But that’s obvious; that’s not a strategy, it’s a requirement.

So what is it that department stores can do to gain some grip again with consumers and stakeholders? It’s not what most would find natural, and it would certainly involve a radical change in mindset.

Department stores rely on brands. Brands rely on department stores. Together they can be very good partners, but for the most part they haven’t been. Many brands, including major ones like Coach, Ralph Lauren, and Michael Kors have gravitated away from and out of the department store channel. That’s entirely due to too much promotional activity driven by the department stores that destroys a brand’s clout and kills its profitability. No consumer covets a brand that’s on sale all the time, and no brand wants to work with a retail partner that loses their money all the time.

So let’s fix that.

Retailers, and especially department stores, would benefit immensely if they focused on building healthy, fast-turning, high margin businesses for the brands they sell. As much as many brands don’t like selling to department stores, they are equally uncertain of working with and selling through Amazon. So use that. Department stores should focus on nurturing brands, not killing them and pushing them away. High-impact retailers should look to turn their consumers AND their brands into raving, raging fans.

Granted this may seem simple, but it’s quite the opposite. One of the hardest things for any legacy business or operator to do is to change mindset. It’s not easy to change teams of buyers at department stores from thinking about how to drive sales regardless of the cost to thinking about how to build high-margin, full-impact businesses that drive raving fans and brands. It’s not easy to convert consumers from “seeking discounts” to “wanting brands”. And it’s not easy to say “let me help you build your business” when you’re used to asking “what margin can you guarantee me”.

Likewise its not easy for wholesale teams and leadership to change their mindset from driving bookings with little regard for what can be consumed to focusing on building upon high-margin net sales that pay the bills and enables investment to grow and innovate. It’s not easy for them to think about their businesses at the consumer level as opposed to the account level. And it’s not easy for wholesalers to strategically plan focused, fast-turning businesses as opposed to jamming in broad assortments of stuff that stunts demand, enables markdowns, and baffles consumers.

Regardless of how difficult all this may be, it is absolutely critical for any retailer or wholesaler looking to keep itself from falling further and further down the slippery slope that’s being created by Amazon. Doing this is absolutely worth the effort. And let’s be clear, wholesale isn’t going away; that’s what doing business with Amazon is. So at the end of the day, the only thing that is truly difficult is continuing to do that which does not work.

Let’s fix this now.

 

Photo by Macy’s Backstage/facebook

 

Make people want your products this holiday season

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The holiday selling season is right around the corner. What happens between now and December 25th can either make or break a brand because this period often represents more than 20% of the entire year’s selling.

Want to know how to be successful as a brand or retail of fashion products? Do this…

MAKE PEOPLE WANT YOU PRODUCTS. It’s your choice, it’s in your control, and you do that by setting your stores and channels up to TURN INVENTORY FAST. The faster you turn, the more consumers WANT your products. Forget about sales and margins–see how fast you can make your doors and channels turn.

Getting the right goods in the right locations at the right time is a brand’s ultimate endgame. Executives and leaders focusing their efforts on marketing and promotions, and not spending 2x that time using data to figure out how much of which products need to be set up and ready to go in every door across your distribution network, are going to suffer greatly. It’s what we mean by the shit hitting the fan.

It’s like this: working out in the gym and eating healthy food is awesome, but it means little if you eat too many calories. It’s also important to fuel your body with the right calories at the right time. You have to have your calories under control if you want to be healthy and active. Likewise, you have to have inventory under control and deliver it in the right amounts to the right locations at the right time.

Doing this means knowing exactly how much and which products are being distributed to what doors through your own retail stores, as well as your wholesale partners. Just because you sold a bunch of goods to a wholesale partner, doesn’t mean they know what they’re doing with it. If product doesn’t stick, it comes back and kicks you in the head. A successful brand makes sure the right amount of the right goods are going to every door and location in its entire network. Do the work.

Getting involved in marketing campaigns and product conversations are fun. Traveling around the country to see how products are displayed is important. I get it. Everybody enjoys doing that. But getting your inventory right is what’s going to make you successful or not. Fast sell-thru’s ensure high gross margins, which mean you are fit, lean, healthy, athletic and highly competitive.

 

 

Walmart buys Jet.com

It was announced today that Walmart is acquiring Jet.com. Jet set out to become an Amazon killer. The purchase of Jet by Walmart is an effort by both companies to do just that.

What intrigues me the most about this is that it leads me closer to the belief that Amazon will likely acquire Macy’s in due time. Walmart needed Jet to get deeper into the E-commerce space. Amazon needs Macy’s to get deeper into the store space.

The question I think other retailers and especially brands need to ask themselves is how do you compete or manage into this new retail model. It’s sort of like LinkedIn selling itself to MicroSoft. LinkedIn, as big and successful as it was, didn’t have the resources to advance itself and compete against Facebook and Google. As a brand or retailer of fashion goods, or any consumer good for that matter, you need to ask yourself what this really means.

It’s no longer about product, it’s about marketing and inventory. As a brand you need to market a lifestyle concept that people really freakin want. And if you have any hopes of being successful you’ll need to crowdsource those product to make sure you manage inventory. There will be no room for mistakes when you have what amounts to two behemoths controlling the entire marketplace.